The Opioid Bill is a massive step forward in this State’s handling of marijuana.  Not only does it effectively create chronic pain as a qualifying condition but it also cuts the patient application wait time from the months that it has been taking to a mere minutes – for opioid patients and medical cannabis patients alike.  This is how the program will work:

  1. Start Date. IDPH claims the program will begin January 31st (fingers crossed)
  2. Who Qualifies.  Anyone whom a doctor has prescribed an opioid to, or who has a condition that a doctor might prescribe an opioid to.  This means you don’t have to have an opioid prescription, just a condition that might warrant one.  Considering how easily doctors hand out pain pills, this includes a whole lot of people.
  3. From Certification to Access. Opioid bill patients, just as with medical cannabis patients, will first need to get an Illinois-licensed MD or DO to approve and submit their certification form. Patients can then immediately go online to complete the rest of their application and receive a registration number – the application will require a State ID or Driver’s License, and proof of Illinois residency. This registration number can then be used, at the moment it is received, to enter a dispensary and purchase cannabis. Application delays will no longer exist and access will be nearly instantaneous.
  4. Allocation Amount. Opioid patients, just as medical cannabis patients, will be able to purchase up to 2.5oz of usable marijuana every 14 days.
  5. Length and Cost. Opioid certifications will have to be renewed every three months and will only cost $10. At $40 per year, this option seems quite a bit cheaper than the $100 per year that medical cannabis program patients pay.  However, this won’t be the case for anyone who has to pay out of pocket to see a doctor for their certification renewal because, while medical cannabis patients only need to renew their certification every three years, opioid patients will need to renew every three months.

The reality is that almost everyone who qualifies under the opioid bill also qualifies under the medical cannabis bill, so you should discuss with your certifying physician which is the best option for you.

To get the process started fill out the form below and we’ll get you all the information you need to be able to purchase cannabis on January 31st.

The Opioid Bill is a massive step forward in this State’s handling of marijuana.  Not only does it effectively create chronic pain as a qualifying condition but it also cuts the patient application wait time from the months that it has been taking to a mere minutes – for opioid patients and medical cannabis patients alike.  This is how the program will work:

  1. Start Date. IDPH claims the program will begin January 31st (fingers crossed)
  2. Who Qualifies.  Anyone whom a doctor has prescribed an opioid to, or who has a condition that a doctor might prescribe an opioid to.  This means you don’t have to have an opioid prescription, just a condition that might warrant one.  Considering how easily doctors hand out pain pills, this includes a whole lot of people.
  3. From Certification to Access. Opioid bill patients, just as with medical cannabis patients, will first need to get an Illinois-licensed MD or DO to approve and submit their certification form. Patients can then immediately go online to complete the rest of their application and receive a registration number – the application will require a State ID or Driver’s License, and proof of Illinois residency. This registration number can then be used, at the moment it is received, to enter a dispensary and purchase cannabis. Application delays will no longer exist and access will be nearly instantaneous.
  4. Allocation Amount. Opioid patients, just as medical cannabis patients, will be able to purchase up to 2.5oz of usable marijuana every 14 days.
  5. Length and Cost. Opioid certifications will have to be renewed every three months and will only cost $10. At $40 per year, this option seems quite a bit cheaper than the $100 per year that medical cannabis program patients pay.  However, this won’t be the case for anyone who has to pay out of pocket to see a doctor for their certification renewal because, while medical cannabis patients only need to renew their certification every three years, opioid patients will need to renew every three months.

The reality is that almost everyone who qualifies under the opioid bill also qualifies under the medical cannabis bill, so you should discuss with your certifying physician which is the best option for you.

To get the process started fill out the form below and we’ll get you all the information you need to be able to purchase cannabis on January 31st.

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